Scottish Enterprise

Scottish Enterprise (SE) is Scotland's main economic, enterprise, innovation and investment agency. SE's ultimate goal is to stimulate sustainable growth of Scotland's economy. To achieve this SE helps ambitious and innovative businesses grow and become more successful and also works with public and private sector partners to develop the business environment in Scotland. SE delivers a range of dedicated support services locally, nationally and internationally. To build a world-class economy, SE is interested in industries that have real competitive advantage in Scotland. SE work in partnership with universities, colleges, local authorities and other public sector bodies to achieve its goals.
50 Waterloo Street
G2 4QE
Glasgow | GB
www.scottish-enterprise.com
Sarah English

Themes

Innovation, Enterprise, Social, Energy, Environment, Regional

Programmes

The LIFE programme is the EU’s funding instrument for the environment. The general objective of LIFE is to contribute to the implementation, updating and development of EU environmental policy and legislation by co-financing pilot or demonstration projects with European added value.
COSME is the EU programme for the Competitiveness of Enterprises and Small and Medium-sized Enterprises (SMEs). It supports the competitiveness, growth and sustainability of EU's enterprises, in particular SMEs, and promoting entrepreneurship. To reach this, the programme eases SME's access to finance by providing loan guarantees and risk-capital, facilitates access to new markets inside and outside the EU and improves the framework conditions for businesses, e.g. by reducing the administrative burden on SMEs.
Supporting European cinema and the cultural and creative sector and enabling them to increase their contribution to jobs and growth. The programme will support tens of thousands of artists, cultural professionals and cultural organisations in the performing arts, fine arts, publishing, film, TV, music, interdisciplinary arts, heritage, and the video games industry, allowing them to operate across Europe, to reach new audiences and to develop the skills that are needed in the digital age. By helping European cultural works to reach new audiences in other countries, the new programme will also contribute to safeguarding and promoting Europe's cultural and linguistic diversity.
Securing Europes global competitiveness, strengthening its position in science and its industrial leadership in innovation by providing major investment in key technologies, greater access to capital and support for SMEs. The programme aims at tackling societal challenges by helping to bridge the gap between research and the market. Horizon 2020 is designed to be a different kind of EU research programme - funding the entire value creation chain from fundamental research through to market innovation, and with drastically less red tape.
The Connecting Europe Facility will support the development of high-performing, sustainable and efficiently interconnected trans-European networks in the field of energy, telecommunications and transport; building missing cross-border links and removing bottlenecks along main trans-European transport corridors. CEF will allow the construction of projects that would not be taken up by the market otherwise. Creating a centrally managed infrastructure fund will minimise the administrative burden and decrease the costs for the EU budget by promoting synergies on project and programme level.
European Structural Funds provide EU Member States and regions with assistance to overcome structural deficiencies and to enable them to strengthen competitiveness and increase employment. The Scottish Government is the Managing Authority for Structural Funds in Scotland and has overall responsibility for supervising the implementation; ongoing management; and effectiveness of the programmes. In the period from 2014-20, Scotland will focus the Structural Funds on achieving structural reforms which facilitate sustainable economic growth. As EU Funds are deployed alongside significantly greater national resources, efforts will focus on quite specific niche investments which would not otherwise take place, or not to the same scale and timeframes, without Structural Funds. Deliberate efforts to create alignment between all EU Funds deployed in Scotland should ensure that the funds act together to support growth and jobs.
European Structural Funds provide EU Member States and regions with assistance to overcome structural deficiencies and to enable them to strengthen competitiveness and increase employment. The Scottish Government is the Managing Authority for Structural Funds in Scotland and has overall responsibility for supervising the implementation; ongoing management; and effectiveness of the programmes. In the period from 2014-20, Scotland will focus the Structural Funds on achieving structural reforms which facilitate sustainable economic growth. As EU Funds are deployed alongside significantly greater national resources, efforts will focus on quite specific niche investments which would not otherwise take place, or not to the same scale and timeframes, without Structural Funds. Deliberate efforts to create alignment between all EU Funds deployed in Scotland should ensure that the funds act together to support growth and jobs.
The Northern Periphery and Arctic Programme (NPA)2014-2020 forms a cooperation between 9 programme partner countries; the Member States of Finland, Ireland, Sweden and the United Kingdom (Scotland and Northern Ireland) in cooperation with the Faroe Islands, Iceland, Greenland and Norway. This means that the programme area encompasses the Euro-Arctic zone, parts of the Atlantic zone and parts of the Barents region, neighbouring on Canada in the West and Russia in the East.
The Cross-border Territorial Cooperation Programme for Northern Ireland, the Border Region of Ireland and Western Scotland (INTERREG Programme), is a European Territorial Cooperation programme that aims to promote greater economic, social and territorial cohesion. It seeks to address the economic and social problems which result from the existence of borders.
The Programme aims to embed greater cooperation in working practices across the North Sea Region (NSR) as a way of tackling joint challenges, pooling expertise and building lasting links between businesses and institutions throughout the NSR. The North Sea Region (NSR) comprises the whole of Norway and Denmark, the eastern parts of the United Kingdom, three provinces of the Flemish Region of Belgium, the north western regions of Germany, the northern and western parts of the Netherlands and the south western area of Sweden. All regions are on or close to the coast of the North Sea itself. The NSR covers an area of some 664,000 km2 and approximately 60 million people.
The Interreg VB North West Europe (NWE) programme is a transnational European Territorial Cooperation Programme and is one of the European Cohesion Policy instruments funded by the European Commission. It is designed to strengthen territorial cohesion within the NWE area by reducing imbalances among the regions. The NWE programme funds activities based on the cooperation of partners from eight countries: Ireland, the Untied Kingdom, Belgium, and Luxembourg, parts of France, Germany and the Netherlands as well as the non-EU member state Switzerland. The area has a population of about 180 million people living in the eligible area of 845 000 km². The ambition defined by the Member States for the NWE area is: “To be a key economic player in the world and create an attractive place to work and live, with high levels of innovation, sustainability and cohesion”